Thursday, April 2, 2009

Outriggers and Proa, part .01: Wipke's Bigiw Bangkaa

Wipke's Bigiw



Ronelo



bow



hull



Ronelo's father and his son



over the corals



Edgar splitting bamboo for the battens



Wipke laying out the sail



fansail



sailing



the local kids having a go


all photographs courtesy Wipke Iwersen



Wipke Iwersen, artist/philosopher/inventor and driving force behind the fabulous Windvinder, sent me some photos of her Philippine double outrigger canoe. The builder is Ronelo Banggat from Tagpopongan, Philippines. Ronelo and his father build these 'composite' boats, with help from Ronelo's young sons. I say composite because the lower part of the hull is a dugout and the rest is ply. These boats were traditonaly built in the same way but with woven, tarred bamboo in place of the more recent plywood. The dugout bit and the frames are fashioned from local wood the outriggers of bamboo and the only tools used are hand tools fashioned by local blacksmiths. The three generations of the Banggat family are able to produce 4 to 5 of these boats per month, from felled tree to three coats of epoxy paint. The family has been building these boats, in the same design, for hundreds of years. They range from 17' to 22' and weigh only about 15 kilos or 33 lbs. These are workboats, used for fishing and transportation and typically paddled from one side only, without going in circles. Some fishermen have made sails from rice sacks as other cloth is unavailable on their island, except gor what Wipke used for her sail. Wipke modified her boat by adding a wingsail after the design of baidarka builder/designer/historian George Dyson, who apparently adapted this design from the batwing design of sails for turn of the century sailing canoes. Wipke fashioned her sail from split bamboo and something she calls 'plastic foil' which looks like what I call polytarp. In any event this a great looking sail and it looks like the kids are having a blast!

If you want one these boats  they go for about 66 euro. or about $90. Without sails. And that doesn't include delivery to White Plains.

5 comments:

françois schelameur said...

Wipke Iwersen found a dream place for her project...look at her website (thanks 70.8), she is realy an inspiration. with some talent, the combination of the local low tech savoir-faire with a minded western vision could create the new way of thinking we all are waiting for!

Shawn said...

$90 for that boat?! Hawaii must at least be only half as far away as White Plains. I'd order a boat from them just for the sake of supporting them. I should probably worry about supporting myself first though. But still, $90?

PeconicPuffin said...

Wonderful post, thanks!

Enter Miles said...

Very nice!
Thanks.
Peter

matthew houskeeper said...

That is amazing!!!